Category: Child Development Information & Ideas

Early Literacy Tips for Parents of Babies | Video Training

Early Literacy Tips for Parents of Babies | Video Training

Early Literacy Tips for Parents of Babies | Reading at Home, Literacy Tips for Parents, Fun Ideas for Kids, Activities for Babies, Read Aloud Tips, Baby Literacy Tips

If you had a baby this year (or are expecting one!), we invite you to join us for this free ONLINE video training about raising readers from infancy. Watch the video for five baby literacy tips you can use immediately to set a good foundation for raising a reader!

Scroll down for all the resources mentioned in this training.


Get your FREE printable book list from rollingprairiereaders.com | best books for babies, baby literacy tips, read aloud, reading at home

Get your FREE printable list:
52 Best Books for Babies! 


Books mentioned in this video:

(Rolling Prairie Readers does use affiliate links, which means we may receive a small commission if you purchase any items we recommend. For the full disclosure policy, you can click here.) 


Join us for a FREE online Literacy & Language Class for babies and toddlers!

Join us for our next Language & Literacy ONLINE class!


TOP BABY LITERACY TIPS:

  • Babies learn through exploration using their five senses, especially taste. Sturdy board books are important for this age and stage.
  • Singing to your babies and reciting nursery rhymes will introduce them to other forms of language.
  • Children who are read to from a young age will associate books with cuddles, time, and attention!
  • Use brightly-colored  or high-contrast board books during tummy time.

Infancy is the perfect time to start good habits with reading before bedtime. Choose a sweet lovey-dovey story to read or recite every night. (Snuggle Puppy by Sandra Boynton was our favorite!)


Grab our FREE Guide for Parents of Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers!

Grab our FREE Guide for Parents of Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers!

Raising children who love reading doesn’t just happen. So let’s be more intentional together, okay?

Learning to Read is a Lot Like Potty-Training

Learning to Read is a Lot Like Potty-Training

Over the last year, I have realized how many childhood skills need to be taught directly and intentionally. Our kids need to learn from us how to appropriately handle money, relationships, and conflict before they become adults, right? It got me thinking about our early years of parenting, all the way back to potty-training, and how easily those same ideas apply to academic skills like learning to read and write.

Learning to Read is a Lot Like Potty-Training | early literacy, parenting tips, ideas for families, child development, preschool, Kindergarten, 1st grade, motivation, fun, encouragement

It’s a beautiful process, one of my favorite things about parenting. Both of my girls have become happy, independent readers…and I love it. If you’re at all concerned about your child’s journey toward becoming a reader, I have some encouragement for you:

  • Every child will learn in his/her own time.

Parents often ask me about programs and curriculums designed to teach young kids how to read. Like potty-training, I think our culture has turned learning to read and “getting ahead” into a money-making opportunity. Is Reading Eggs fun? Yes. Is it necessary? Probably not.

Learning to read is a milestone in every child’s life that cannot (and should not) be rushed. A child who is read to regularly will love books and learn how to read when the time is right.

  • There is no ONE “right” way to learn.

There has been a major push toward phonics-based programs over the past decade: books, DVDs, apps. While I certainly believe phonics are an integral part of any literacy program, there is SO much more to learning to read.

The good news is, there are as many ways to learn how to read as there are potty-training methods. In all facets of early learning, I believe in finding the “right” way for YOUR child and YOUR family.

  • Every adult caregiver needs to be on the same page.

As I have mentioned before, I have a background in elementary education. I have a HUGE respect for teachers, especially those who teach preschool and Kindergarten. I was a teacher before I was a mom, though–and if I stepped back into a classroom tomorrow, I would do things differently.

Yes, teachers know a lot about child development and classroom management, but parents are the TRUE experts when it comes to their children.

Learning to Read is a Lot Like Potty-Training | early literacy, parenting tips, ideas for families, child development, preschool, Kindergarten, 1st grade, motivation, fun, encouragement

Kids will have an incredible number of influential adults in their lives: coaches, church workers, doctors, and teachers. Parents are the consistent thread throughout a child’s lifetime. You know how your child learns best, what his interests are, what kinds of books will keep her up with a flashlight at night. When it comes to your child’s learning journey, YOU are the adult with the most influence.


Grab our FREE Guide for Parents of Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers!

Grab our FREE Guide for Parents of Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers!

Raising children who love reading doesn’t just happen. So let’s be more intentional together, okay?

Make Learning Fun … at Home!

Make Learning Fun … at Home!

Yesterday (September 19th) was Talk Like a Pirate Day. We celebrated with costumes, a reading of Tough Boris, and a trip to our local bakery for a donut. (Don’t all pirates eat donuts?) As I planned this goofy little break in our daily routine, I though about each of YOU and your children.

It seems like the current state of education has become overwhelming for us and for our children: homework, standardized testing, getting into a good college (and figuring out how to pay for it). I wanted to share how we–parents–can make learning fun at home for our children! 

I am a BIG believer that education SHOULD be a joyful experience for our children. It breaks my heart when I hear kids says, “I don’t like school,” or “Reading is boring!” In fact, one of my major goals for Rolling Prairie Readers is to help all parents (including myself) re-think about our attitudes and actions about learning. When we say, “I don’t like math,” or “I’m not good at art,” we are impacting the way our children think about the world!

Make learning fun at home! Read good books, learn through play, go on family adventures, and talk positively about school and books with your children.

So, what are some ways we can make learning fun at home?

  1. Talk positively about learning. Our children will be in school for at least 13 years (not counting college), so it’s important that we are strong supporters of our schools, teachers, libraries, and education in general. Make a point to stop negative talk early, and reframe our children’s frustrations as much as possible. (“I can’t do it,” becomes “I can’t do it yet, and that’s okay!”)
  2. Make GOOD books a part of your family’s culture. Visit the library often. Buy books for gifts. Read aloud to your children even after they can read to themselves. Listen to audiobooks on long trips. (You can click here to read 12 Ways to Incorporate Reading into Your Daily Routine.)
  3. Offer your child several opportunities to learn through play each day. Consider how your child learns best, and add in more music, videos, or sensory bins. I have several seasonal “invitations to play” here on the blog for FREE. You can also browse my Pinterest boards for more ideas!
  4. Chase adventures together. It doesn’t matter if you travel near or far, there is much to be learned from this big world of ours!

Imagine that your’s child learning journey is a hunt for treasure. You have been given the map to guide your child through dangerous and wild lands, past hard times and seemingly insurmountable challenges. Hopefully along the way, your child will learn that the real treasure is a life of learning…with you!

Sign up for a FREE mini-plan! Our mini-plan gives you a sneak peek at the planning process and includes 3 custom activities for your toddler/preschooler.