Category: Learning At Home

Solar Eclipse Tips and Resources for Kids

Solar Eclipse Tips and Resources for Kids

If you’re like me, your newsfeed is FULL of news and updates about the upcoming U.S. solar eclipse on Monday, August 21st. There’s a lot of information out there, so I wanted to grab the “best of the best” for all of you to peruse quickly before Monday.

We like to use major events like these to pique our girls’ interest in new ideas (like the solar system!) and go deeper in our learning while interest is high.

What is a solar eclipse, and why is it such a big deal?

This video from SciShow Kids explains it perfectly!

How can I watch it (safely)?

If you live in this zone, you’ll be able to see some or all of the eclipse in your own yard!

Map of the 2017 solar eclipse, courtesy of NASA
Source: NASA

If you’re not able to see it outside, be sure to check out this live stream!

Know the Risks, Don’t Peek!

Note: Some scientists are disputing Dr. Schecter’s post, so use caution and make the best decision for your family. 

Helpful Idea to Try with Kids:


Other Ways to Watch the Solar Eclipse:

Learn more about the solar system with these great solar eclipse resources!

More Solar Eclipse Activities:

If your kids are like mine, they will likely be talking about the eclipse for days (or weeks!). Take advantage of their excitement to learn more about the sun AND take some time to preserve their memories of the day.

Solar System Book Recommendations | Solar Eclipse 2017

Book Recommendations:

My girls LOVE to read, so I always try to have a few non-fiction books available about the topic we’re studying. Visit your local library, or add a few new books to your collection. We have not found many eclipse-specific books, but are using the experience to learn more about the solar system in general. As an Usborne Books & More Consultant, I recommend these five great books:

Big Book of Stars and Planets from Usborne Books & More

The Solar System from Usborne Books & More

Sun, Moon, and Stars from Usborne Books and More

100 Things to Spot in the Night Sky from Usborne Books & More
Technically not a book, but a box of information cards.

Secrets of Our Earth from Usborne Books & More

Additional Resources:

  • NASA has set up a homeschool section on their solar eclipse website, including family activities and lesson plans for all ages.
  • I will continue to update this post as new resources become available!
Learning at Home Tips and Resources + FREE Ultimate Guide!

Learning at Home Tips and Resources + FREE Ultimate Guide!

For the last few weeks, I have been sharing my favorite learning at home resources and tips.  (You can read all of those posts by clicking here or scrolling down for the full list.)

As a former elementary school teacher, I NEVER imagined I’d be a homeschooling mama to my own two girls. But looking back on my years in the classroom, I’ve always been a big believer in individualized education.

When it came time to enroll my sweet five-year-old in Kindergarten, it was clear that she was more than ready academically, but not anywhere close to being prepared emotionally or physically. As I mentioned previously:

Homeschooling for Kindergarten meant we could give our girls more time to mature emotionally and physically while still giving them what they needed academically.

Five years later, we still love homeschooling our girls. But I believe that learning at home happens in ALL families, whenever we read a good book, play a game, go an adventure, write a letter to a family member, etc.

Many parents have come to me and said, “My child is going to preschool x days a week, but we still want to do some learning activities together. What do you recommend?”

And so I have created this FREE guide (scroll down to get yours) to help you get started on your learning at home journey–to create personalized learning plans for YOUR family this year.

Learning at Home Tips & Resources | How does my child learn best? What should my young child be learning? | tot school, preschool at home, homeschooling, learning at home, learning through play


What should my young child be learning?

In another recent post, I shared my thoughts on curriculum for young children:

Curriculum is simply meant to be a jumping off point for teachers (and homeschooling parents). All too often, we become more focused on teaching the next lesson in the book rather than what our child needs to learn next.

So the question becomes, “What does my child need to learn next?”

There are many developmental checklists available for parents, and I also offer a quarterly Age-Appropriate Learning Workshop online. Children rarely develop on a timeline, so my number one piece of advice for parents is to work backwards. What do you want your child to know this time next year? What are the skills he/she needs to develop to get there?


Learning at Home Tips & Resources | How does my child learn best? What should my young child be learning? | tot school, preschool at home, homeschooling, learning at home, learning through play


How does my child learn best?

There are five different modes of learning (often called “learning styles”):

  • visual (graphics)
  • auditory
  • read/write (text)
  • kinesthetic (movement)
  • tactile (touch)

When your child is young, he or she will learn best through hands-on learning. Toddlers and preschoolers love to dance, shake, climb, and move; learning might also happen through song and repetition (hence, the popularity of nursery rhymes!). 

As your child grows and learns to read independently, he/she will begin to demonstrate a preference for one or more of the different learning styles. Note: I believe knowing how your child learns best (and helping him/her to understand what that means) is crucial to success in higher education.

Taking learning styles into account is incredibly important for science and math courses, as I mention in this post about our favorite resources for math education. Good teachers will introduce new concepts in a variety of ways and work with your child in his/her preferred learning style, but it’s also an important consideration for independent practice and homework.

Keep in mind that most people are multi-modal and often show a distinct preference for two or more learning styles at the same time. It’s also important for all of us to strengthen our weaker areas for times when modifications cannot be made. For more information about learning styles, click here.


Learning at Home Tips & Resources | How does my child learn best? What should my young child be learning? | tot school, preschool at home, homeschooling, learning at home, learning through play


Other posts about learning at home that may interest you:


Grab your FREE Ultimate Guide to Learning at Home!

Tot School Must-Haves

Tot School Must-Haves

Five years ago, we decided to do preschool at home with our older daughter. As a former classroom teacher, I may have overdone “the school at home” a bit. (I totally did, and you can read about it here.) For some unknown reason, it seems we–as parents–are in a continual rush to push our children ahead to the next stage.

Did you know the number one search result for both “tot school” and “preschool at home” is all about choosing curriculum? Which program will prepare my child for Kindergarten?

The truth is, NO curriculum or program can give your child exactly what he or she needs to get ready for Kindergarten.

While I am not anti-curriculum, I don’t think it’s necessary for MOST families who choose to do tot school or preschool at home. Curriculum is simply meant to be a jumping off point for teachers (and homeschooling parents). All too often, we become more focused on teaching the next lesson in the book rather than what our child needs to learn next.

"Play is the work of the child." --Maria Montessori | play-based learning, learning through play, developmentally-appropriate practice, preschool curriculum

More important than curriculum–in my opinion–is the learning environment we create for our children.

It starts with curating our toys (and books) for maximum impact. We want to choose items that can be used for open-ended play, in a multitude of ways, throughout the year. What objects can be mixed and matched to teach our child new concepts?

Recommended items for your tot school or preschool at home from an experienced homeschooling mom! | learning through play, homeschool curriculum recommendations, personalized learning

Here are some of our favorite “must-haves” for every family considering tot school or preschool at home:

 (Note: affiliate links included at no cost to you!)

Manipulatives

  • pom poms
  • clothespins
  • colored straws
  • pony beads
  • pipe cleaners

Accessories

  • muffin tin
  • glass jar
  • empty Parmesan cheese container
  • funnel
  • “chip and dip” container
  • trays
  • tongs and other fine motor tools

Extras

Don’t forget

  • regular trips to the library
  • reading aloud
  • lots (and lots!) of time outside

 


Are you an auditory learner? Listen to this post on Anchor.fm!

Listen to The Parent Resource Room on Anchor.FM


We are five years into our homeschooling journey, and I feel like I am a better teacher now than right after college. I see my children’s unique strengths and weaknesses, understand the way they each learn best, and supplement our curriculum with hands-on learning experiences custom-designed to their needs.

The benefit of a personalized learning plan is this:
education becomes a lifestyle rather than a year’s worth of curriculum.

If you would like help creating a personalized learning plan for your child, leave me a comment! I’d love to chat. (And don’t forget to grab your freebie below.)


Grab your FREE Learning at Home Checklist! | child development, family relationships, homeschooling advice, homeschooling for beginners, tot school

Grab your FREE Learning at Home Checklist–10 questions to get you thinking about
tot school, preschool at home, or homeschooling for Kindergarten!