Author: Melissa Droegemueller

6 Fun Activities for Teaching Colors to Kids

6 Fun Activities for Teaching Colors to Kids

When you have young children in the house, the three most important concepts to work on are letters, numbers, and teaching colors. When my own girls were preschool-age, we did everything we could to make learning colors easy for them!

If you are teaching colors to your toddler or preschooler this year, check out these fun and simple ideas!

Pictures of toys with text overlay: 6 Simple Ways to Teach Colors to Toddlers and Preschoolers

6 Activities for Teaching Colors:

(Reminder: Rolling Prairie Readers uses affiliate links at no additional cost to you. You can see our full disclosure policy here.)

  • “Color of the Week” Basket

When our kids were little, toy rotation worked the best for us! Every week, we included a big bowl full of toys from our weekly color: bristle blocks, large magnetic letters, musical instruments, vehicles, plastic cookie cutters, play food, Duplos, etc.

  • Songs & Sign Language

For four years of my girls’ preschool years, I taught “Mommy & Me” sign language classes in our home. We reviewed counting, ABCs, and colors each week using Rachel Coleman’s Colors of the Rainbow song and Laurie Berkner’s Balloons song. Our girls learned the signs for colors before they could say the words.

  • Lots of Props!

Along with singing songs every week, we also used scarves and balloons to practice our color words! Katie especially loved using the scarves while she read (looked at) one of her favorite books, Color Dance.

  • Color Sorting

We sorted toys by color ALL THE TIME. Our favorite tools were a large, green “chip and dip” container from Dollar Tree (with six compartments) and a muffin tin! We sorted magnetic letters, fuzzy pom poms, animal counters, and even cut straw pieces. As you can see in the image, I added labels with the color sight words to each of the compartments for a little extra literacy fun.

  • Rainbow Noodles

Back in March, I dyed a box of rigatoni noodles with food coloring to make “rainbow noodles.” These have been great for stringing, patterning, and stamping in playdough! (See the tutorial here.)

  • Color Mixing

One of the things I recommended to preschool parents all the time is to buy only a few colors of paint (red, blue, yellow, white, and black) and mix up shades every time we did an art project. We have learned how to make secondary colors (green, orange, and purple) and combination colors like brown and teal. The book Mouse Paint is a great one to read with kids if you’re looking to learn more about color mixing!


Grab your FREE Ultimate Guide to Learning at Home from Melissa Droegemueller of Rolling Prairie Readers


Hopefully, these six simple activities, games, and songs make teaching colors FUN! Remember, the goal is to connect with your kids through play, so try to follow their lead and match their interests.

Which of these activities for teaching colors will you try first?

Did you find this post helpful? Be sure to save it for later!

Picture of color toys with text overlay: "6 Fun Activities for Kids who are Learning Colors"

17 Awesome Space Books for Kids

17 Awesome Space Books for Kids

As much as I would love to take my girls into space to learn more about our solar system, technology isn’t quite there yet! Thankfully, we do have the ability to see videos of the Earth and moon from outer space–thanks to NASA and companies like SpaceX. We can also explore the Milky Way from the comfort from our couch, thanks to a variety of space books for kids that are available at the library.

Whenever we start a new unit of study, I like to provide a big stack of books for my kids to peruse. Space is such a fun topic to learn more about, from the sun to the planets, past missions to the moon and future expeditions to Mars! Books about space can inspire, educate, and engage even the most reluctant reader.

17 Awesome Space Books for Kids

(Reminder: Rolling Prairie Readers uses affiliate links at no additional cost to you. You can see our full disclosure policy here.)

Space Books for Kids: Solar System

Space Walk by Salina Yoon

The Solar System by Emily Bone

National Geographic: Planets by Elizabeth Carney

The Sun’s Family of Planets by Allan Fowler

The Planets by Gail Gibbons

Demoting Pluto: The Discovery of the Dwarf Planets by Steve Kortenkamp

Find the Constellations by H. A. Rey

Comets, Meteors, and Asteroids by Seymour Simon

Space Books for Kids: Astronauts and Exploration

Space Travel by Martha Rustad

Rocket to the Moon: The Incredible Story of the First Lunar Landing by Lisa Combs

One Giant Leap: The Story of Neil Armstrong by Don Brown

Neil Armstrong and Traveling to the Moon by Ben Hubbard

On the Space Station {A Shine-a-Light Book} by Carron Brown & Bee Johnson

Mae Among the Stars by Roda Ahmed

You Should Meet Mae Jemison by Laurie Calkhoven

Space Books for Kids: Fiction

Life on Mars by Jon Agee

Meteor! by Patricia Polacco

Learning more about the solar system with your kids is a fantastic way to make learning fun at home! I have never met a child or adult who isn’t interested in space and there are so many subtopics to explore.

Let me know which of these you read with your kids in the comments below!


Want even more space fun?

Picture of Earth and moon with text overlay: "Space Activities"

The summer months are a great time for learning together as a family! Grab our space-themed Family Activity Guide today for a full month of fun as you discover more about the sun, planets, and the moon.

Click here to purchase our space activities!


Did you find this post helpful? Be sure to save it!

17 Space Books for Kids

Why Your Family Needs an Adventure Backpack

Why Your Family Needs an Adventure Backpack

Many, many years ago, there was a movie called One Fine Day featuring Michelle Pfeiffer and George Clooney as two single parents working together to juggle their kids and their jobs. One of the recurring jokes in the movie is that ultra-controlling mom Pfeiffer always has what she needs in her bag, from juice boxes to costumes for the kids. Clooney, more of a fly-by-the-seat-of-your-pants dad, even asks at one point, “Where I can get a bag like that?”

I’m not sure why that random movie fact has stuck with me for more than 20 years, but I had a similar moment last week when we met up with some friends at a fairground. One of my girls needed to use the bathroom immediately, so we walked to the Porta Potties right around the corner. As she came out of her little hut, I was waiting with wipes and some hand sanitizer, which made my friend crack a joke about being a Boy Scout. I joked right back, “I’m not a Boy Scout, I’m a mom.”

Our family tradition of carrying a backpack came right after the diaper bag years. Typically, our “adventure backpack” stays in the trunk of our family car, filled with all the supplies we tend to need most.

Whether your family adventures include travel or exploring the outdoors, an adventure backpack can make life with kids easier!

Young girl on dad's shoulders with text: 16 Must-Haves for Family Adventures

What is an adventure backpack?

Our backpack is a simple, two-shoulder bag that holds all the things our kids tend to need when we are hiking, geocaching, touring the zoo, or visiting an apple orchard. We keep it light enough that any one of us can carry it if needed–but not so light that we end up sunburned or covered in bug bites because the sunscreen and/or bug spray is in the other car.

What should we put in our adventure backpack?

(Reminder: Rolling Prairie Readers uses affiliate links at no additional cost to you. You can see our full disclosure policy here.)

The type of backpack your family chooses depends on the types of activities you’ll need it for. Rarely do we hike more than a couple of hours and we typically drive right to our campsites, so we don’t need an actual hiking backpack. A regular school pack works just fine for our adventures, so long as it has lots of pockets for our supplies:

  • hats for everyone
  • sunscreen
  • umbrella
  • insect repellent
  • bandaids
  • wipes
  • hand sanitizer
  • tissues
  • pain reliever
  • flashlight
  • compass
  • whistle
  • water bottles
  • snacks (optional)
  • zipper bags for trash or nature collections
  • notepad and pencil

Where should we take our adventure backpack?

  • Our family loves to go traveling–you can follow our adventures over on Instagram.
  • You can also read our guest post all about family adventures over on BethanyIshee.com {coming soon}.
  • Get lots of destination ideas here on our Family Adventures Pinterest board!

If your family is looking to have more adventures full of hands-on learning and fun memories, keeping a family adventure backpack in the car will be a lifesaver!

What do you keep in your adventure backpack?


Did you find this post helpful? Be sure to save it for later!

What is a family adventure backpack and WHY do we need one?