Category: Reading Aloud

WHY does my child want to read the same book again and again?

WHY does my child want to read the same book again and again?

Picture a toddler, sitting in a high chair during a family meal. He drops his sippy cup onto the floor and looks at his mom. She brightly exclaims, “Uh-oh!” and bends down to pick up the cup. Moments later, he deliberately lets go of the cup again. “Uh-oh,” he says with a smile.

“Uh-oh” is one of my favorite stages in child development. Our children become young scientists, learning more about the ways of the world through repetition.

On the other hand, they may also become obsessed with their favorite color, their favorite show, their favorite book–wanting the SAME stories, the SAME snack, the SAME toy…each and every day.

Why Does My Child Want to Read the Same Book Again and Again? | repetition, early literacy, child development, raising readers, read aloud

It’s one of the frustrations that come up when I ask parents about their read-aloud routines with their children: “I get tired of reading the same books over and over again.” We certainly went through the same phase where we read the same Caillou book to our toddler for weeks in a row.


While it’s aggravating for us as parents, there is a scientific reason why our children are so drawn to doing the same things again and again.


Repetition is an important strategy for the brain development of our young children (babies, toddlers, and preschoolers) and has many benefits:

  • teaches cause and effect
  • builds anticipation
  • establishes connections in the brain

Why Does My Child Want to Read the Same Book Again and Again? | repetition, early literacy, child development, raising readers, read aloud


Children’s Books Featuring Repetition:

(Reminder: Rolling Prairie Readers uses affiliate links at no additional cost to you. You can see our full disclosure policy here.)

Every time our children read (or hear) a familiar book, they are learning new vocabulary, observing more details in the illustrations, and developing a stronger memory. Teachers and authors know how important consistency can be for young children, which is why so many “classic” and beloved children’s books feature repeating lines, such as:

While reading the same book again and again can become tiresome for us, you can be confident you are helping your child become a more confident, successful reader–and surely, that is what we ALL want for our kids!

Here’s a tip if your child is “stuck” on one book. Read the book he or she is requesting, as usual, along with two other books. Choose one a favorite from the past (that YOU love) and a new book that you wouldn’t mind becoming the replacement favorite. (And then record yourself reading the book you’re tired of, either on audio or video, so your child can replay it on demand. Read more here.)


Need some new book ideas?
Be sure check out our 25 “Must-Have” Read-Aloud Authors List!


Grab our FREE Guide for Parents of Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers!

Raising children who love reading doesn’t just happen. So let’s be more intentional together, okay?

My child want to read the same book again and again. WHY Repetition is GOOD for Our Young Children | reading aloud, stories for kids, child development
5 Great Benefits of Reading to Babies from Birth

5 Great Benefits of Reading to Babies from Birth

Reading to babies is one of the first and best things parents can do! If you’ve ever wondered when to start, let me tell you that is never too early (or too late!) to read aloud with your kids. I actually read to both of our girls while pregnant and love talking about the massive benefits of introducing our children to books from a very young age.

five great benefits of reading to babies from birth

Welcoming a new baby is a sweet and exciting time for any family. There is a nursery to prepare, a car seat to purchase and install, and so many tiny little clothes to wash and fold. Many parents have a baby shower, and my go-to gift is a bundle of two wonderful books by Australian author, Mem Fox: Reading Magic (for the parents) and Where is the Green Sheep? (for the baby).

(Reminder: Rolling Prairie Readers uses affiliate links at no additional cost to you. You can see our full disclosure policy here.)

Our first daughter was born prematurely and spent her first few months in the NICU. I spent my days sitting by her side, alternatively poring over Reading Magic while she slept. I read aloud picture book after picture book during her awake hours so she could hear my voice. It was at that moment that our family culture was born. Books had always been a huge part of my life as a child and young adult, and now they are a huge part of our family as well.

Read more of this post about reading to babies over at everythingbabies.org!

Be sure to grab our FREE 52 Best Books for Babies List–just fill out the form below:

10 Ways to Keep Hands and Minds Busy During Read-Aloud

10 Ways to Keep Hands and Minds Busy During Read-Aloud

Welcome to our Read-Aloud series!


Our oldest daughter is a snuggle bug. Her two love languages are physical touch and quality time, so needless to say, she’s always loved curling up on the couch for a good read-aloud session.

On the other hand, our younger daughter is a tactile/kinesthetic learner. Her body is constantly in motion, and she resists sitting still for a story. She slides down off the couch and plays with anything she can find within reach.

I used to let it bother me. I used to correct her: force her to sit next to me and look at the pictures as I read aloud.

But that’s not who she is–she’s an auditory learner, and she hears every word I say–whether I think she’s paying attention or not. I often find her later, sitting on the couch alone, rereading the book and looking at the pictures at the pace that suits her.

10 Ways to Keep Hands and Minds Busy During Read-Aloud | quiet activities, read aloud, tactile learners, auditory learners, activities for kids

I’ve learned to be okay with our differences. Now we dance for 10-15 minutes every morning before read-aloud time, and I don’t mind at all if she chooses to play quietly during the story.

(Reminder: Rolling Prairie Readers uses affiliate links at no additional cost to you. You can see our full disclosure policy here.)

Most of the time she brings out her favorite bristle blocks, school bus, and wooden people. When I’m done reading, I hear her acting out the story I just read with her little characters.

As parents, it’s important for us to determine if our children are deliberately disobeying us or if they simply cannot do what we are asking of them.

We also should ask, “Does this really matter to me?” After thinking about it, I realized that I would rather have a quiet, happy child listening to the story than have her grow up despising our read-aloud times because I made her sit on the couch with me.

10 Ways to Keep Hands and Minds Busy During Read-Aloud | quiet activities, read aloud, tactile learners, auditory learners, activities for kids

If you decide to provide your child with quiet activities during read-aloud times, keep in mind that there is no “magic” product or activity. I’ll share some of our favorite ideas, but honestly — the BEST activity is the one that works for you and your child.

10 Quiet Activities to Keep Hands and Minds Busy During Read-Aloud:

  1. Bristle blocks (we have these)
  2. Puzzle
  3. Wooden people (we have these, in addition to the set with the school bus found here)
  4. Foam blocks (look at the dollar store)
  5. Pipe cleaners
  6. Water beads (we have these)
  7. Modeling clay
  8. Geoboard (we have these)
  9. Paper and crayons
  10. Quiet sensory items, like pom poms, cut straw pieces, etc. Children love to sort, count, fill, and dump little items —celebrate their contentment and read a chapter or two!  

If you have any additional suggestions for quiet activities, I would love for you to leave them in the comments!


Grab our FREE Guide for Parents of Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers!

Grab our FREE Guide for Parents of Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers!

Raising children who love reading doesn’t just happen. So let’s be more intentional together, okay?