Tag: read aloud

18 Human Body Books for Kids

18 Human Body Books for Kids

Are you teaching your children about the different parts of their body? These 18 human body books will bring learning to life for your kids! You can also scroll down to see some of our favorite human body resources for kids of all ages.


(For more 40 more science activities about healthy human bodies, check out our latest Family Activity Guide in The Play School Club.)


When our girls were young, we bought a wooden human body puzzle from Discovery Toys. It had five layers, each one showing a different “system” of the body (skeleton, organs, muscles, skin, and then the top layer of clothing). I can’t tell you how many times I found one of my kids working on that puzzle!

We also watched two episodes from Rachel and the Treeschoolers over and over again! Both My Amazing Body and Happy, Healthy Me (episodes 5 and 6) are perfect for preschoolers and primary grade students who are wanting to learn more about human anatomy.

Scroll down for links to all of these resources.

healthy body books for kids

And now for our favorite human body books for kids!

(Just a reminder that Rolling Prairie Readers uses affiliate links, at no additional cost to you. You can read our full disclosure policy here.)

When it comes to learning about the human body and the five senses, there’s no better place to start than The Magic School Bus books.

We also found this great “Super Simple Body” series at our library that include beautiful pictures, detailed drawings, and science experiments.

Doreen Cronin (Click, Clack, Moo) has a cute trio of books that are perfect for ACTIVE kiddos.

If you are looking for books about healthy boundaries for children and their bodies, these two both get my stamp of approval.

And in no particular order, 3 more human body books:

human body books for kids

Additional resources (mentioned above):

Note: The puzzles are anatomically correct.

If I missed any of your favorite human body books, be sure to leave a comment.

17 Bug Books for Kids

17 Bug Books for Kids

Spring has sprung, and we are excited to learn more about the bugs in our yard! There are so many fascinating facts about insects, and reading more about them can make learning fun. Our library has lots of great bug books for kids, and here are some of our favorites.

17 Fantastic Insect and Bug Books for Kids

Bug Books for Kids

(Just a reminder that Rolling Prairie Readers uses affiliate links, at no additional cost to you. You can read our full disclosure policy here.)

Scholastic’s Bug Dictionary by Jill Bailey

Worldwise: Insects and Spiders by Penny Clarke

Do All Bugs Have Wings? by Suzanne Slade

Bugs are Insects by Anne Rockwell

Usborne’s 1001 Bugs to Spot by Emma Helbrough

DK Eyewitness: Insects by Laurence Mound


Insect and Bug Activities for Kids

Want to learn more about bugs?

Check out our 40 fun learning activities!


Eric Carle Bug Books

Eric Carle is one of our favorite author-illustrators, and The Very Hungry Caterpillar is a classic children’s book! (Did you know it’s celebrating its 50th birthday?) Mr. Carle has also written a bunch of other books about insects and arachnids:

The Grouchy Ladybug by Eric Carle

The Very Busy Spider by Eric Carle

The Very Quiet Cricket by Eric Carle

The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle

Enjoy this sweet video of Mr. Carle talking about The Very Hungry Caterpillar.


More Insect Books for Kids

Taking my kids to the library to experience the non-fiction section is one of my favorite things. They get to explore a variety of books all about one topic and discover new authors they might not have tried otherwise. (Anne Rockwell and Gail Gibbons are two of our favorite non-fiction writers, and Lois Ehlert has written and illustrated many terrific children’s books!)

A Butterfly is Patient by Dianna Hutts Aston

Becoming Butterflies by Anne Rockwell

Monarch Butterfly by Gail Gibbons

Waiting for Wings by Lois Ehlert

The Big Bug Book by Margery Facklam

Beetle Bop by Denise Fleming

It’s a Good Thing There Are Insects by Allan Fowler

Do you have favorite bug books for kids? Leave a comment, and let me know!

The Importance of Nursery Rhymes in Literacy Development

The Importance of Nursery Rhymes in Literacy Development

Everything I know about early literacy, I learned from Mem Fox.

Our first child was born in the summer of 2008, about 14 weeks before her due date. I spent the first six weeks of her life (AKA “maternity leave”) sitting in an uncomfortable chair by her isolette. I couldn’t hold her or feed her, pick out her clothes, or doing anything that a new mother gets to do, really.

This was pre-smartphone (and we couldn’t have our phones on in the NICU anyway). I passed the time by working on a cross-stitch project for her “someday” bedroom and reading tons of books.

One of the first books I remember reading during those long summer days was Reading Magic by Mem Fox.

As an elementary school teacher, I knew all about early literacy and helping kids fall in love with books in a classroom setting. As a first time mom, though, I had very little clue about what I should be doing with my newborn daughter to set a good foundation for early literacy.

Mem’s sweet words showed me the ONE thing that I COULD do in those early days of our daughter’s long NICU stay: I could read to her.

The best time to start reading aloud to a baby is the day it is born. --Mem Fox

I brought in tote bags of picture books from my years in the classroom and set them up on the shelf next to her isolette. I read book after book to her, and then I switched to chapter books to make them last longer. We read Ramona the Brave and Gooney Bird Greene. I read to her from my own books, too.

Before long, I was able to take her out of her isolette, feed her small bottles of milk, and pick out her clothes. But our favorite activity to do together was READ. The foundation had been set.

By the time our second daughter was born (on time) three years later, I was ready for her! I packed Mem’s beautiful book Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes in my hospital bag. Within hours of her delivery, I was reading aloud.


I’ve talked about Mem Fox and Reading Magic here on the blog before.

Today, I want to talk about the importance of nursery rhymes, which she covers in chapter 10.

Why nursery rhymes are important for early literacy development!

We all know that young children have short attention spans, which makes songs and short rhymes a perfect fit. And as Mem says, “Songs and rhymes provide comforting rhythms in children’s early lives and also expose kids to gorgeous forms of language. They are a natural extension to the heartbeat of the mother and the rhythmic rocking of a child in loving arms or in a cradle.

Songs and rhymes allow busy families to play with language on the go:

  • in the car
  • waiting in line at the grocery store
  • even during those countless bathroom hours while potty-training!

Nursery rhymes can help with preschool literacy development, too! Young children learn new vocabulary and begin to anticipate the missing rhyming words at the end of each line.

“From songs [and nursery rhymes], children learn words, sentences, rhythm, rhyme, and repetition, all of which they’ll find later in the books they read.”

–Mem Fox, Reading Magic

Rhymers will be readers: it's that simple. --Mem Fox

The importance of nursery rhymes cannot be overstated or underestimated. According to Reading Magic, “experts in literacy development have discovered that if children know eight nursery rhymes by the time they’re four years old, they’re usually among the best readers by the time they’re eight.”

How do we incorporate nursery rhymes into every day play?

  • Invest in a quality anthology of Mother Goose or other rhymes.
  • Write a few on index cards and place them around your home.
    • Put one on the bathroom sink to recite while washing hands.
    • Hang one above the changing table to make wiggly changes a little easier.
    • Keep one or two in the diaper bag for the next time you’re stuck in a waiting room.
  • Choose one rhyme a month to focus on together. Plan a few fun extension activities that coordinate nicely, like a relay race up a hill for Jack and Jill.
  • Add more rhymes to your child’s educational playlist and let it run during independent play time.

“Once children have masses of rhythmic gems like these in their heads, they’ll have a huge store of information to bring to the task of learning to read, a nice fat bank of language: words, phrases, structures, and grammar.”

–Mem Fox, Reading Magic

What are your thoughts on the importance of nursery rhymes?


Watch the Facebook LIVE on this topic, and then check out the nursery rhymes FREEBIE in our Resource Library!


Nursery Rhymes Family Activity Guide

We’ve just released our NEW nursery rhyme Family Activity Guide for busy families with kiddos ages 2-6. There are 10 popular rhymes included, each with four FUN, hands-on learn activities that you can do any time of the year! Focus on one rhyme a month or do all forty activities in one unit study–the choice is up to you.

The guide is part of our affordable monthly subscription program, The Play School Club. Learn more here!