Tag: parenting

Best Books About Kindness and Friendship

Best Books About Kindness and Friendship

Valentine’s Day is around the corner! While February is typically known as a time to show romantic love, it’s also an excellent time to teach children about the power of friendship and and kindness. There are many great ways to teach kids to be kind to others, but our favorite is through books, of course!

Books about kindness and friendship give children the opportunity to learn about empathy in a safe environment. Taking time to talk about the characters and their choices is the most important part of the family read-aloud experience. Read on for our five favorite kindness books for kids!

Best Books About Kindness and Friendship | kindness books for kids, intentional bookshelf, teaching with books, recommended picture books

Best Books About Kindness & Friendship

(Rolling Prairie Readers does use affiliate links, which means we may receive a small commission if you purchase any items we recommend. For the full disclosure policy, you can click here.) 

Chrysanthemum
by Kevin Henkes

I’ve talked about our love for Chrysanthemum in our favorite books for new readers post, but I really do recommend this book to everyone! It’s a great story for back to school or when a child is feeling anxious about a new experience. It’s also the perfect introduction to what bullying can look like in a classroom. Why don’t Chrysanthemum’s classmates stand up for her? Are they afraid they’ll be bullied next? Use this book to talk about what YOU would have done if you were in the book.

Bonus: You can also watch this one on DVD (narrated by Meryl Streep)!

Corduroy
by Don Freeman

Corduroy is one of those “classic” books that really has endured through many generations. It’s a sweet and simple story that any toddler will love, especially if there is a special lovey in the family. Use this book to talk about taking care of others. What does it look like to be a friend?

Officer Buckle & Gloria
by Peggy Rathmann

This is one of my favorite picture books because it’s just ridiculous from begining to end. Children will love looking at all the details in the illustrations! But the best part of this Caldecott-winning book is the true friendship between Gloria the dog and her human, Officer Buckle. It’s a great invitation to discuss how our friends can (and should!) bring out the best in us.

My Rotten Redheaded Older Brother
by Patricia Polacco

Growing up, I always wanted an older brother. My husband tells me of his many adventures and mischief-filled days with his older brother, much like Patricia and Richie in this autobiographical book by my very favorite author. Don’t be turned off by the title; this relatable book ends with a very sweet moment between two siblings, showing our kids that family can be friends, too.

Chicken Sunday
by Patricia Polacco

As I mentioned, Ms. Polacco is my favorite children’s author, and I probably could list every book she’s ever written in this kindness category. But I am choosing Chicken Sunday as our family’s “book of the month” because it has so many rich characters and moments of kindness. Set a few years after the story above, Tricia is now living in California with her mom and brother. She has added new family members, neighbor Miss Eula and her grandsons Winston and Stewart, and builds a true friendship with hat shop owner Mr. Kodinski. This book features so many rich cultural and religious moments, showing our children what a life of diversity and respect can look like.

We’ll be taking the lessons found in Chicken Sunday and using them as a jumping off point for our “theme of the month” discussions in The Intentional Book Club.

Throughout the month of February, Club Founder Samantha Munoz is leading the conversation about using books to teach our kids about cultural awareness. She has family activity ideas, book recommendations, and even an interview with children’s author Medeia Cohan! I am so excited for this new, amazing resource for our family.

You can learn more about The Intentional Book Club here, or click on the image below to join us!

Join other intentional families in The Intentional Book Club!

Before you go, I would love to hear YOUR favorite kindness books for kids!

Early Literacy Tips for Parents of Preschoolers

Early Literacy Tips for Parents of Preschoolers

Literacy Tips for Parents of Preschoolers | benefits of reading at home, fun learning ideas, raising readers, reading with your child, encouraging tips, learning to read, teaching kids to read

If you have a preschooler, you are probably wondering about HOW to prepare your child to become a reader. The most important job you have as a parent during this stage of the reading journey is motivation. We want our kids to see learning to read as an exciting adventure, and we’ll talk about about it in this free ONLINE video training. Get five literacy tips that you can use immediately with your preschool-age child.

Scroll down for all the resources mentioned in this training.

Need to find more time in the day to read with your preschooler? Check out this post for 12 fun ideas!

Books and resources mentioned in this video:

(Rolling Prairie Readers does use affiliate links, which means we may receive a small commission if you purchase any items we recommend. For the full disclosure policy, you can click here.) 


TOP TIPS FOR CHILDREN IN PRESCHOOL:

  • Talking about stories allows a child to learn more about emotions (WHY a character feels the way they do), reasoning/logic, and picture-text connections.
  • Act out stories together. Encourage your child to bring characters and plots from their favorite stories into their block/dramatic play.
  • Expose your child to lots of new experiences! Prior knowledge will help your child understand what they’re reading later.

Teach your child to “picture walk” through a story. Sometimes this is a fun way to introduce a new book! Children who know how to deduce a story from the illustrations are not dependent on a reader to decode the text every time.

  • Watch TV with the captions on!
  • Introduce letters and sounds. Keep this fun and low-pressure (child-led) if you can. We used jumbo magnetic letters and an oil pan.
  • Rhyming games are a fun and important way to learn ending sounds. Make a points system for nonsense words and those with more than one syllable.
  • Give your child plenty of opportunities to write! Make a writing station with paper and pencils/crayons, use chalk outside, etc.

Grab our FREE Guide for Parents of Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers!

Grab our FREE Guide for Parents of Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers!

Raising children who love reading doesn’t just happen. So let’s be more intentional together, okay?

Early Literacy Tips For Parents of Toddlers | Video Training

Early Literacy Tips For Parents of Toddlers | Video Training

Toddler Literacy Tips: Free Video Training | toddler literacy activities, fun learning ideas, reading at home, tips for parents, language development, listening activities, nursery rhymes, tot school, preschool at home, parenting

If you have a busy toddler, you know how tricky storytime has become! There are fun ways to keep your little mover interested in books, and we’ll talk about them in this free ONLINE video training about raising readers. Get five simple toddler literacy ltips that you can use immediately to set a good foundation for raising a reader!

Scroll down for all the resources mentioned in this training.
Click on the image below for more information about our online class for little ones & their caregivers!

Join us for a FREE online Literacy & Language Class for babies and toddlers!


Get ideas for an educational playlist for your toddler here! Listen and learn while you move and play.


Books and resources mentioned in this video:

(Rolling Prairie Readers does use affiliate links, which means we may receive a small commission if you purchase any items we recommend. For the full disclosure policy, you can click here.) 


TOP TODDLER LITERACY TIPS:

  • Toddlers learn by doing. Allow them to move while you’re reading or choose quiet toys for reading time. (We love bristle blocks.)
  • It’s okay to flip through the pictures with an impatient toddler–attention spans are only about two-minutes long at this time!
  • But don’t give up on reading! The more you do it, the more stamina your child will have.
  • Use audio books or personal recordings so your toddler can listen “on demand.”

Read and re-read favorite books. Young children are obsessive about their favorite toys, T.V. shows, and friends—books are no different. (We often let our girls pick a book and we pick something new/more literary to complement our reading time.) Click here for more on the importance of repetition!

  • Make story time at the library a priority! Use the time to meet other local families, meet the librarian, participate in family reading challenges, and check out books each week.
  • Choose interactive books at this age: lift-the-flap, books that make noise, and flashlight books. (All Better is one of our favorites.)
  • Leave small groups of books in each room your child is in. You will be amazed what “strewing” can do to pique interests.
  • Choose lots of interest-based books for daytime reading. (Construction books near the matching toys, etc.)

Grab our FREE Guide for Parents of Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers!

Grab our FREE Guide for Parents of Babies, Toddlers, and Preschoolers!

Raising children who love reading doesn’t just happen. So let’s be more intentional together, okay?